Kristie Kannaley
Semester Plan Proposal
11th Grade American Literature
Hoodlums, Rebels, and Outcasts:
Growing Up in Communities Across America

Overarching Essential Questions:
· Do all criminals deserve to be punished?
· Are all rules made with the best interest of the community?
· Is it ever acceptable to break the law?
· Can an outlaw still be considered a good person?
· Should an individual be defined by his or her actions?
· To what extent should someone go to protect a loved one?
· How does one know when he or she has become an adult?
· How does the community influence a teenager’s upbringing?
· Is it always bad to conform to “the crowd?”
· Can an individual have more than one home?
Unit one: Growing Up in a Cruel World- There are Two Sides to Every Story
Main texts:
West Side Story by Arthur Laurents
The Crucible by Arthur Miller
Excerpts from The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien
“The Black Cat” by Edgar Allen Poe
“The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson

Unit two: Rebels on a Mission

Main Texts:
The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
We Were Here by Matt De La Pena
“The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” by Mark Twain

Unit Three: The Apple and the Tree: Community Influence on Perception

Main Texts:
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros
“The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Unit One- Growing Up in a Cruel World: There are Two Sides to Every Story
Established Goals:

National:- Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.
-Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.
-Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).
ELAALRL1 The student demonstrates comprehension by identifying evidence (i.e., examples of diction, imagery, point of view, figurative language, symbolism, plot events and main ideas) in a variety of texts representative of different genres (i.e., poetry, prose [short story, novel, essay, editorial, biography], and drama) and using this evidence as the basis for interpretation.
Specifically: Point of View, racing history of the development of American fiction, Identify/analyze types of dramatic literature, Analyzes characters, structures, and themes

ELAALRL2 The student identifies, analyzes, and applies knowledge of theme in a work of American literature and provides evidence from the work to support understanding.
Specifically: Applies knowledge of the concept that the theme or meaning of a selection represents a universal view or comment on life or society and provides support from the text for the identified theme, Evaluates the way an author’s choice of words advances the theme

ELAALRC2 The student participates in discussions related to curricular learning in all subject areas. The student
Specifically: Relates messages and themes from one subject area to those in another area, Examines the author’s purpose in writing

ELAALRC4 The student establishes a context for information acquired by reading across subject areas.
Specifically: Explores life experiences related to subject area content, discusses in both writing and speaking how certain words and concepts relate to multiple subjects, determines strategies for finding content and contextual meaning for unfamiliar words or concept, Include a formal works cited or bibliography
Understandings:
Students will understand that. . .
- Writing or reading from different points of view can completely change a story
- Fictional literature can be historically accurate
- Characters working for similar goals may actually have different intentions
- Pieces of literature can be reflective of real-world society
- Authors may have multiple intentions when composing pieces of literature
- The words an author uses can develop the mood of a scene or an entire novel
- Literature from the past can relate to issues today
- Students may misunderstand character intentions (I plan on using whole-class discussion to solve this issue)









Essential Questions:

Should an individual be defined by his or her actions?
Is it ever acceptable to break the law?
To what extent should one go to in order to protect a loved one?
Does an individual’s intentions always influence the outcomes of situations?
Can a story told from different perspectives still be accurate?
What does it mean to become an adult?
How does an individual’s word choice effect how others view him/her?
What is the “right” way to solve a problem?
How does community effect an individual’s point of view?

Students will know. . .
- How to read character intentions based on their language and actions
- How to relate pieces of literature to both past and current issues
- How to recognize possible authorial intent within a piece of literature
- How to search for themes in a piece of literature
- How to use history to contextualize a work of literature


Students will be able to. . .
- Write from multiple points of view
- Uncover universal themes in pieces of literature
- Read for clues to authorial intent
- Relate fictional stories to historical events and time periods
- Recognize multiple styles of writing and how they are reflective of specific time periods
- Recognize various “coming of age” determinants in different American cultures


Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence

Performance Tasks:

-Anticipation Guides (before each major piece of literature) will be used to generate group discussion
- Journaling from a specific character’s point of view in The Crucible
- Select a children’s story and rewrite it in the voice/with word choices that Edgar Allen Poe would have used (pg 89 Noden)
- Write a 3-page modern-day “West Side story” (see Noden pg 97 for creating special effects with sentence structure
- Neighborhood Assignment (from 3310)

Other Evidence:

- Quiz on topics related to the Salem Witch Trial
- Test on West Side Story
- Essay on The Crucible (4-pages, compare the fictional play with historical facts)
- Ongoing informal assessment: completion of journal entries and participation in whole and small group discussion
- Completion of homework assignments








Stage 3—Learning Plan

Learning Activities:
“Think in Threes” handout (pg A-25 of Reading Reminders) for point of view

- Include video clips from the movie version of The Crucible (Is this how you saw it when you read it? How does your point of view as a teenager in this century effect how you read a novel?)
- Hook students by giving them information about the Salem Witch Trials (gives students a context and allows them to discuss a topic that is not commonly discussed)
- Journaling (helps students reflect on the literature and how it relates to themselves)
- Coming of Age Tree- Students must keep assignment through the whole semester, since other units will build upon it
- Draw “The Lottery” (pg 227 of Burke)
Unit 2- Rebels on a Mission
Established Goals:
National: Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and non-print texts.
-Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.
-Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).
ELAALRL1 The student demonstrates comprehension by identifying evidence (i.e., examples of diction, imagery, point of view, figurative language, symbolism, plot events and main ideas) in a variety of texts representative of different genres (i.e., poetry, prose [short story, novel, essay, editorial, biography], and drama) and using this evidence as the basis for interpretation.
Specifically: Irony, Flashback, Patterns of Symbolism, Traces of history of the development of American fiction, Analyzes, evaluates, and applies knowledge of the ways authors use language, style, syntax, and rhetorical strategies for specific purposes in nonfiction works, Analyzes and evaluates the effects of diction and imagery, Analyzes the characters, structures, and themes of dramatic literature

ELAALRL2 The student identifies, analyzes, and applies knowledge of theme in a work of American literature and provides evidence from the work to support understanding.
Specifically: Applies knowledge of the concept that the theme or meaning of a selection represents a universal view or comment on life or society and provides support from the text for the identified theme, Evaluates the way an author’s choice of words advances the theme or purpose of the work, applies knowledge of the concept that a text can contain more than one theme, Analyzes and compares texts that express universal themes characteristic of American literature across time and genre

ELAALRL4 The student employs a variety of writing genres to demonstrate a comprehensive grasp of significant ideas in selected literary works. The student composes essays, narratives, poems, or technical documents.
Specifically: Demonstrate awareness of an author’s use of stylistic devices and an appreciation of the effects created by the devices, Analyze the use of imagery, language, and other particular aspects of a text that contribute to theme or underlying meaning

ELAALRC3 The student acquires new vocabulary in each content area and uses it correctly.
Specifically: Demonstrates an understanding of contextual vocabulary in various subjects, Uses content vocabulary in writing and speaking, explores understanding of new words found in subject area texts


Understandings:
Students will understand that. . .
- Knowing how to use a word is more important than being able to identify its meaning on a test
- Symbolism is a literary element that can be used to make writing more interesting
- The syntax of a sentence can affect the emphasis the statement is making
- Many characters have multiple layers (few are entirely “good” or “bad”)
- Society often influences how individuals in a community think and act
- Literary texts pose questions that relate to current issues









Essential Questions:

Do all criminals deserve to be punished?
Are rules made with in best interest of the community?
Can a person really be “good” or “evil?”
Should an individual be judged by his or her actions?
Can living in a c0mmunity influence how an individual thinks? Is it possible to avoid being influenced by others|?
Can words be more violent than physical actions?

Students will know. . .
- How to incorporate new vocabulary words into their writing
- That the use of symbolism and varying syntax can strengthen writing and even change the meaning of a text
- That they can be influenced by the media through different forms such as music, television, and magazines
- One book can have multiple themes
- Imagery creates visuals for the reader

Students will be able to. . .
- Use new words in correct context
- Recognize symbolism in multiple pieces of literature and analyze the significance of various symbols
- Use varying syntax throughout different types of writing
- Recognize propaganda in the media
- Analyze the effects of imagery in a piece of literature and use it in their own writing


Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence

Performance Tasks:
- “Where I’m From” Poem (Imagery assignment)
- “I Was There” personal narrative w/varying syntax + participation in feather circle
- “Scarlet Letter of Apology” activity
- “Puritan Profile” (offer historical context for why you used certain characteristics in a character’s online dating profile)

Other Evidence:
-The Scarlet Letter in-class essay exam
-SAT Prep Vocabulary Test (using words in context)
-Ongoing participation in discussions
- Participation in literature circles
- “Coat of Arms” assignment (imagery)





Stage 3—Learning Plan

Learning Activities:
- Venn Diagram- Public Dimmesdale vs. private Dimmesdale
- Literature Circles with The Scarlett Letter
- “Vocabulary Square” – see Burke pg A-29
- Clips from Easy A?
- Active and Passive voice mini lesson (GML)
- Develop “Author’s Word and Phrase Palette” (see page 39 of Anderson)
- Mini group project (in-class) “Sentence Smack Down!” with We Were Here (see Anderson pg 162)
- “Coat of Arms” provides a chance to write and draw
- Puritan Historical Timeline- organized in a way that would appeal to more spatial-oriented students
- Turn The Scarlet Letter into a comic (why did you choose those scenes? How are they representative of thematic elements of the novel?









Unit Three- The Apple and the Tree: Community Influence on Perspective
Established Goals:
National: Students develop an understanding of and respect for diversity in language use, patterns, and dialects across cultures, ethnic groups, geographic regions, and social roles.
-Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience.
-Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes

ELAALRL1 The student demonstrates comprehension by identifying evidence (i.e., examples of diction, imagery, point of view, figurative language, symbolism, plot events and main ideas) in a variety of texts representative of different genres (i.e., poetry, prose [short story, novel, essay, editorial, biography], and drama) and using this evidence as the basis for interpretation.
Specifically: Locates/analyzes language and style and imagery, Identifies/responds to/analyzes the effects of diction/tone/mood/syntax/sound/form/figurative language/structure in poetry, recognizes sound: alliteration, end rhyme, slant rhyme, internal rhyme, consonance, assonance, analyzes form in poetry: fixed and free, lyric, ballad, sonnet, narrative poem, blank verse

ELAALRL2 The student identifies, analyzes, and applies knowledge of theme in a work of American literature and provides evidence from the work to support understanding.
Specifically: Applies knowledge of the concept that the theme or meaning of a selection represents a universal view or comment on life or society and provides support from the text for the identified theme, Applies knowledge of the concept that a text can contain more than one theme

ELAALRL4 The student employs a variety of writing genres to demonstrate a comprehensive grasp of significant ideas in selected literary works. The student composes essays, narratives, poems, or technical documents.
Specifically: Analyze the use of imagery, language, and other particular aspects of a text that contribute to theme or underlying meaning, Demonstrate awareness of an author’s use of stylistic devices and an appreciation of the effects created by the devices

ELAALRC2 The student participates in discussions related to curricular learning in all subject areas.
Specifically: Responds to a variety of texts in multiple modes of discourse, Evaluates the merits of texts in every subject discipline, Examines the author’s purpose in writing

ELAALRC4 The student establishes a context for information acquired by reading across subject areas.
Specifically: Explores life experiences related to subject area content, Discusses in both writing and speaking how certain words and concepts relate to multiple subjects


Understandings:
Students will understand that. . .
- There are different kinds of families in literature and in the real world
- The setting of a story can sometimes have impacts on character behavior
- Different structures in poetry are used for different purposes
- Pieces of literature can have more than one theme
- How intentional language choice can affect a piece of literature
- There are multiple purposes for writing pieces of literature

















Essential Questions:
-Are all rules made with the best interest of the community?
-Can an individual be defined by other people?
-Is the place you sleep always considered your home?
-How does one know when he or she has become an adult?
-How does the community influence a teenager’s upbringing?
- Is it always bad to conform to “the crowd?”
- Can you have more than one home?
- Should people who one considers to be family be genetically related?


Students will know. . .
- How to recognize poetic elements such as imagery, hyperbole, ect.
- How to recognize popular types of poetic structure such as free verse, blank verse, ect.
- How to analyze the language choices and imagery produced within a text (I think this might be a tough point for them to understand)
- How to contextualize a story through the setting



Students will be able to. . .
- Use effective persuasive language while giving a verbal presentation
- Use setting as a literary element to increase the effectiveness of their writing
- Recognize and write in different styles of poetry using numerous literary elements
- Examine authorial intentions and think about their own intentions as they write


Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence

Performance Tasks:
-Censorship presentation: Students will be assigned to either defend why The Hunger Games should/should not be banned from schools in a verbal persuasive presentation
- Finish “Coming of Age Tree Assignment”- create a comic strip about your life as of now (focus on setting/choosing scenes)
- “Found Poetry” Assignment with The House on Mango Street
- Alternative Home Assignment- Take a picture of your “home” and write a poem in free verse that uses description reflective of all 5 senses

Other Evidence:
- Statement of authorial intent: 1 paragraph (“The Yellow Wallpaper”)
- Final Exam for semester (comprehensive)

Stage 3—Learning Plan

Learning Activities:
- “Oprah Book Club” activity with The Hunger Games (authorial intent)
- Literature circles with The House on Mango Street
- Bring in popular song lyrics (poetry connection)