Scary Mary Examining Mood in Movie Trailers Lesson Plan

Georgia Standards Lesson Plan Format

http://www.georgiastandards.org/


Name: Kristie Kannaley

School: Lost Mountain Middle School

Lesson Title: Scary Mary: Examining Mood in Movie Trailers

Annotation: This lesson will serve as an introduction to mood and tone. The students will be given a handout with words that relate to mood, and we will go over the difference between mood and tone. Two separate movie trailers of Mary Poppins will be shown to demonstrate differences in mood. EQ: How can the author’s tone influence the mood of the reader?

Primary Learning Outcome: Students will understand and have experience with analyzing the mood in a text. They will need to think critically about audience and how the writers established tone in their trailers.

Assumptions of Prior Knowledge: Students should already be able to describe their reactions to texts by using adjectives. This prior knowledge will prepare them for deeper analysis.

Assessed GPS’s: ELA6R1 The student demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational texts.


National Standards: Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.

Materials: class set of “tone= speaker’s attitude” handout, class set of “mood= emotional effect that the text creates for the audience” handout, computer/projector to show video clips, class set of head/body handout, class set of note cards (exit ticket)
Total Duration: Thirty minutes

Procedures:
1) The teacher will hand each student a copy of each handout. We will begin class by discussing the head/body handout. The teacher will explain that mood refers specifically to the reactions of the reader, while tone refers to the speaker’s attitude. Then, the teacher will point it out to the students that the “Mood=Emotional effect” and “Tone=Speaker’s Attitude” handouts have separate sets of words that can be used for description. This should take about ten minutes.
2) Secondly, the teacher will hand out the note cards to the students while explaining that they are about to watch two movie trailers for the same movie. They will have to write three words from the “Tone=Speaker’s attitude” handout and three words from the “Mood=Emotional Effect” handout to describe the first clip on the front of the card and three tone words and three mood words to describe the second clip on the back of the card. This should take about five minutes.
3) Next, the teacher will show the first video clip, which is located at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fuWf9fP-A-U. The teacher will give the students a minute or two to write down their three words at the end of the clip. Then, there will be a class discussion on the clip. The teacher should ask the students what words they chose, why they chose them, and what specific elements of the clip made them choose those words. Also, the teacher should ask the students what type of audience would want to watch the clip. This should take about ten minutes.
4) After ten minutes, the teacher will show the other video clip, which is located at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2T5_0AGdFic. The teacher will give the students a few minutes to write down their words at the end of the clip. Then, there will be a class discussion on the clip. The teacher should ask the students what words they chose, why they chose them, and what specific elements of the clip made them choose those words. Also, the teacher should ask the students what type of audience would want to watch the clip. This should take about five minutes, but if time permits, we will continue discussing until the bell rings. The students will turn in their note cards as an exit ticket on their way out.

Assessment: Students will be assessed by the exit tickets they turn in at the end of class. The students should have listed words that relate specifically to mood and tone that logically make sense when paired with each clip.

Extension: Students who already understand mood can take the lesson further by addressing the audience factor. The class will have a discussion about audience, but advanced students will want to consider why and how the authors have addressed a specific audience.

Remediation: Students who struggle with this lesson will likely have difficulty with the vocabulary on the handouts. The teacher can help the students define any words they do not understand or can create a handout with definitions for these students.

Works Cited and Consulted:
Hart, Lenzi. “Tone and Mood Lesson.” Brighthub: The Hub for Bright Minds. Bright Hub, 18 June 2010. Web. 10 Oct. 2010.

“Original (1964) Mary Poppins Theatrical Trailor.” YouTube. YouTube, 1 July 2007. Web. 10 Oct. 2010.

“The Original Scary Mary Poppins Recut Trailor.” YouTube. YouTube, 8 Oct. 2006. Web. 10 Oct. 2010.


tone = speaker’s attitude


POSITIVE TONE WORDS
NEUTRAL
(+, -, or neutral)
NEGATIVE TONE WORDS
admiring
adoring
affectionate
appreciative
approving
bemused
benevolent
calm
casual
celebratory
cheerful
comforting
comic
compassionate
confident
delightful
earnest
ecstatic
elated
empathetic
encouraging
excited
exhilarated
expectant
facetious
fervent
friendly
funny
gleeful
gushy
happy


hilarious
hopeful
humorous
interested
introspective
jovial
joyful
light
lively
modest
nostalgic
optimistic
passionate
playful
proud
reassuring
reflective
relaxed
respectful
reverent
romantic
scholarly
self-assured
serene
silly
straightforward
sympathetic
tender
tranquil
whimsical
worshipful
zealous

commanding
direct
impartial
indirect
meditative
objective
questioning
speculative
unambiguous
unconcerned
understated

abhorring
ambiguous
angry
annoyed
antagonistic
anxious
apprehensive
belligerent
bewildered
biting
bitter
blunt
bossy
cold
conceited
condescending
confused
demanding
depressed
derogatory
despairing
desperate
detached
disappointed
disliking
disrespectful
doubtful
embarrassed
enraged
fearful
forceful
frantic
frightened
frustrated
furious
gloomy
grave
greedy
grim
harsh
haughty
holier-than-thou
hopeless
hostile
impatient
incredulous
indifferent
indignant
insecure
lethargic
melancholy
mischievous
miserable
mocking
mournful
nervous
outraged
pathetic
pessimistic
pretentious
psychotic
resigned
reticent
sarcastic
scornful
selfish
serious
severe
sinister
skeptical
sly
solemn
somber
stern
stolid
stressful
suspicious
tense
threatening
tragic
uncertain
uneasy
unfriendly
unsympathetic
upset
violent









mood = emotional effect that
the text creates for the audience


|||| POSITIVE MOOD WORDS
NEGATIVE MOOD WORDS
amused
awed
bouncy
calm
cheerful
chipper
confident
contemplative
content
determined
dignified
dreamy
ecstatic
empowered
energetic
enlightened
enthralled
excited
exhilarated
flirty
giddy
grateful
harmonious
hopeful
hyper
joyous


light-hearted
loving
mellow
nostalgic
optimistic
passionate
peaceful
playful
pleased
refreshed
rejuvenated
relaxed
relieved
satisfied
silly
surprised
sympathetic
thankful
thoughtful
touched
trustful
warm
welcoming
aggravated
annoyed
anxious
apprehensive
barren
brooding
cold
confused
cranky
crushed
depressed
disappointed
distressed
drained
dreary
embarrassed
enraged
envious
exhausted
frustrated
gloomy
grumpy
haunting
heartbroken
hopeless
hostile
infuriated


intimidated
irate
irritated
jealous
lethargic
lonely
melancholic
merciless
moody
morose
nauseated
nervous
nightmarish
numb
overwhelmed
painful
pessimistic
rejected
scared
serious
sick
somber
stressed
suspenseful
tense
terrifying
threatening
uncomfortable
vengeful
violent
worried