Georgia Standards Lesson Plan Format

http://www.georgiastandards.org/


Name: Kristie Kannaley

School: North Cobb High School

Lesson Title: Thought Bubbles: Thinking about the Thoughts and Themes in The Scarlet Letter

Annotation: This lesson is meant to be an introductory lesson for The Scarlet Letter. The students will begin thinking about some of the major essential questions for the unit, such as “Can a person be clearly classified as good or evil?” and “How does group identity influence the individual?”

Primary Learning Outcome: After this lesson, students should be able to find connections and/or form opinions about how the overarching themes of the unit, such as community, judgment, and individuality, are applicable in a contemporary context. Furthermore, students should be able to use the text to defend how they characterize the major characters in the novel The Scarlet Letter.

Assumptions of Prior Knowledge: Before this lesson, students should have read chapters 1-3 of The Scarlet Letter and therefore should be familiar with the major characters that are introduced at the beginning of the book. Furthermore, the students should have completed the anticipation guide for homework before this class period in order to participate in the class activity. Students who have completed the reading assignment and the anticipation guide should have all of the prior knowledge they need of the text to move forward through the lesson.

Assessed GPS’s:

ELAALRL1 The student demonstrates comprehension by identifying evidence (i.e., examples of diction, imagery, point of view, figurative language, symbolism, plot events and main ideas) in a variety of texts representative of different genres (i.e., poetry, prose [short story, novel, essay, editorial, biography], and drama) and using this evidence as the basis for interpretation.

ELAALRL3 The student deepens understanding of literary works by relating them to their contemporary context or historical background, as well as to works from other time periods.


National Standards:

Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience.

Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).

Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.

Materials: Copy of The Scarlet Letter anticipation guide, prepared journal prompt, prepared discussion questions, Reader Response assignment sheet, overhead projector, prepared exit ticket questions, copy of assignment sheet for “Character Thought Bubbles” in-class activity


Total Duration: 50 minutes

Procedures:
1) The lesson will begin with the following journal prompt (written on the board): Have you ever felt outcast from a social group? Did you feel like you deserved to be an outcast? What were your thoughts or feelings during this time period? If you have never felt like an outcast, you may write about someone you know or know of who has. (approx. 5 minutes)
2) Next, the class will participate in a whole class discussion about the journal prompt. Some guiding questions to bring it back to the text: How does the situation you described relate to Hester’s situation? What does the community do to separate her, and how effective is this strategy (so far in the text)? Prompt students to use specific examples from the text. (approx. 5 minutes)
3) Project The Scarlet Letter Anticipation Guide on the overhead projector so the students can use it as a reference. Have them stand in the center of the room. The left side of the room will be designated as “agree” and the right side of the room will be designated as “disagree.” read through each statement and ask students to physically move to the side they selected when they completed the guide for homework. Have a few students respond with their reasoning (ask, “Why did you choose “agree” for this statement? What personal experiences led you to make that choice?”) (approx. 15 minutes).
4) Next, hand out the “Character Though Bubbles” assignment sheet. Have students work in groups of two to complete the activity (see attached handout for specific directions). The instructor should walk from group to group to check on the students and answer any questions. The activity should be turned in at the end of class as an assessment. (approx 20 minutes).
5) Students should answer the following questions (post on the overhead) before they leave as an exit ticket: comprehension check of chapters 2-3. Who was the man who Hester saw in the crowd when she stood on the scaffold? How could this man be significant to the story? Why do you think Hester chose not to reveal her “partner in crime?” (approx 5 minutes)

Assessment: GPS ELAALRL1 will be assessed through the “Character Thought Bubbles” in-class activity. The students will have to use textual evidence to defend why they have chosen to write what they have written in the specific thought bubbles. The textual evidence requirement forces students to make informed choices with their characterization. GPSELAALRL3 will be assessed through participation in the Anticipation Guide Activity and through the journal response (journals are taken up once a week).


Extension: Students who can already easily make connections between their personal lives and the concepts addressed in the Anticipation Guide will be pushed to make connections with other texts we have read in the class (or that they have read outside of class). The “Character Thought Bubble” activity can be enriched by having the students consider what people in the United States today would think about Hester’s situation. The students can create thought bubbles for individuals of today and connect them with the Puritan community.

Remediation: Students who are struggling with these concepts may need to see the anticipation guide statements reworded in a different format. The instructor can post the reworded forms of the statements on the class blog. ESOL students are welcome to use the teacher’s copy of The Scarlet Letter, which will have important quotations highlighted for faster access to passages that may need to be reread. Students who struggle with the “Character Thought Bubble” activity may need more time to journal/pre-write about the events that take place in chapters 1-3.

Works Cited and Consulted:

Burke, Jim. Reading Reminders: Tips, Tools, and Techniques. Portsmouth: Heinemann, 2000. Print.
Dail, Jennifer. Anticipation Guide Activity. 15 Sept. 2010.

Hawthorne, Nathanial. The Scarlet Letter. New York: Penguin Group, 2009. Print.

























Character Thought Bubbles Activity

Directions:
· Get into groups of two.
On the back of this assignment sheet, draw a sketch of the scene where Hester stands on the scaffold with Pearl (be sure to include Hester, Pearl, Chillingworth, and other members of the “audience.”
· Create a thought bubble (write what you believe the character could be thinking) for each of the following characters: Hester, Pearl, Chillingworth, and one random member of the audience.
· Choose one line of the text to defend what made you choose the thoughts you wrote about for each character (you should have four separate lines). Make sure you write the page number next to each piece of evidence.
· You will only have 20 minutes to complete this activity, so be careful not to spend too much time on the actual sketch!
· Turn this sheet in at the end of class.



































The Scarlet Letter Anticipation Guide
Directions: On the continuum in front of each of the numbers, place an "x" that indicates where you stand in regard to the statement that follows. Be prepared to defend and support your opinions with specific examples. After reading the text, compare your opinions on those statements with the author's implied and/or stated messages.

Agree Disagree

------------------------ 1. All criminals deserve to be punished.

------------------------ 2. Children should not have to suffer for the mistakes of their parents.

------------------------ 3. People should be classified as “good” or “evil” based off of their actions.

------------------------ 4. It is alright to make an example of someone who has broken a rule.

------------------------ 5. The laws of a community are developed with the best interest of the community.

------------------------ 6. Individuals who are part of a community should live up to the expectations of that community.

------------------------ 7. It is alright to be vengeful if someone has done something wrong to you.

------------------------ 8. Sometimes “running away from your problems” is an acceptable and reasonable solution.






























Journal Prompt 9/6/2011

Have you ever felt outcast from a social group? Did you feel like you deserved to be an outcast? What were your thoughts or feelings during this time period? If you have never felt like an outcast, you may write about someone you know or know of who has.


Questions for discussion:
Why did you choose “agree” for this statement?
What personal experiences led you to make that choice?
How does you example relate to Hester in The Scarlet Letter?








































Exit Ticket 9/6/2011

Comprehension Check of chapters 2-3

Who was the man who Hester saw in the crowd when she stood on the scaffold?
How could this man be significant to the story?
Why do you think Hester chose not to reveal her “partne